Using Free WiFi? Read this….

First, we cried Free Mandela. Next came Free Love, then Free Willy. Eventually, we see Free WiFi all over. The Millennial Creed.

Data is expensive, in my country at least twenty times dearer than even the worst in the USA. It stands to reason that #socialmedia junkies will crave for free Internet access. There always is a quest for the cyberholy grail, Free WiFi.

These hotspots are very unsafe and are best avoided. A rat, meaning a hacker, may be lurking and inject malicious code into the wireless router. The router then will allow him access to any or all devices connected wirelessly to it.

Hackers now can take control of your pukka smartphone or other device, without you even knowing. He can access all your data, steal passwords, banking information and clone your ID.

You also put every person in your contacts at risk as he can now send messages to then all, maybe include a cute emoji that contains a spyware bot – voila! Your entire cyber community betrayed because you wanted a free ride.

In 2018, would you go down to the dockyards for a one night stand, using no protection? No, if you had any margin of sense, of course you wouldn’t. Why take your smart device down a similar road?

Practise a safe connectivity regiment. Don’t let your devices sleep around, promote cyber chastity and prudence.

Read more about malware and cyber attacks here>

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Which Mobile On #Travel? 

Try beat my R599 FreeMe package.

I am what I prefer to call a #permatourist. My own invention.

See, living in Cape Town, South Africa, opens up opportunities every single day. Anyone ever getting bored here, must be missing a gene. So much to see and do, the bulk of it for free. Yep. Mahaila. Pasella. No charge.

In my “job” as travel writer and events reporter, publishing to social media has to be instant. For that, great connectivity is essential. And video devours data.

I travel with three devices and four different SIM cards. My wife has one device. We have Vodacom, Cell C, MTN and Telkom Mobile.

The device with the very best signal ability is a R199 iTel dual-SIM from “PEP Tique.”  The second best is a Huawei LTE mobile hotspot, third is a Mobicel tablet costing R899. Excellent service also came from an old R599 Alcatatel One Touch Pop2. It sounds like a kiddies happy meal toy but had great connectivity and was excellent as a wireless hotspot.

Less great connectivity came from high-end smartphones. We did swap around SIM cards to test all fairly.

The test route took us up to 1,333 km in each direction, a total of fourteen such journeys on different trains. We did fourteen long-distance journeys.

While Vodacom had the best signal coverage, the same cannot be said about its usability. It reminds of the guy pitching up for work but then don’t get much done.

Cell C had better voice connectivity than the others but data throughput suffered.

MTN. If I had something good to say, I would have. During a fortnight stay in suburban Klerksdorp, as during a week in Beaufort West, signal seemed okay but connectivity just failed. GSM. WCDMA. Auto settings. Nyet.

That leaves us with dear old Telkom, on FreeMe plans. Usable for a little over 1,000 km of the entire distance, a clear winner. Useless when roaming through MTN, especially. On its own legs, a better proposition.

Which is why I bought a FreeMe bundle at Telkom V&A Waterfront today and paid R599 for 20GB data. I also received 10GB night data plus 10GB TelkomConnect WAP2-secured WiFi. And 1,500 all networks minutes plus 300 Telkom or Telkom Mobile numbers. Plus 500MB for things like Viber, Whatsapp, etc. Oh, then R600 all networks calling for seven days as yet another bonus.

With its proven reliability, Telkom Mobile FreeMe is a no-brainer. I switched when 8ta was new and saw how service improved, especialy after becoming Telkom Mobile and more infrastructure was employed.

Try beat my R599 FreeMe package.